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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 213 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the battlefield. and they are held under the law of war because we don't want to let them go back to killing us, and they are not given a lawyer because we're not trying to solve a crime, we're trying to win a war. and here's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow t
effectively? he's so passionate about real data and real legal principles and be found as judge walker told us and chat and i refer to that decision, that if we have real data, we will always counter our foes who are trying to throw bias at the sabrett is passionate about that and that is loud be institute to be so successful in what it's done. he has the talent for tracking leading scholars from all over the country in an incredibly successful way so that over the years we have watched brad with his organizational chart and he filled in all the slots and we arrived at where we are today. so i thank you very much for the contribution he has made for us and i will turn it over to him to introduce the panel. >> thanks so much, tom. [applause] i want to start out by thanking tom. we were here at the very beginning like he said in this very room and his step with us along the way and that's really important to work here and around the country. i also want to thank matt and -- for putting together this great panel and doing all the work that gets all of us here in his room for this great commerce s
security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently demonstrated the capability of advanced biofuels during massive exercise that featured a carrier strike gr
. >> this is "cnn breaking news." >> and we begin with breaking news out of the conflict zone, an attack at the u.s. embassy in tel aviv in israel. details just coming in, but an israeli police spokesman says a security guard at the embassy was attacked with an ax. the attacker reportedly also had a knife on him. we know the attacker has been arrested. when we get more information, we will bring that to you. of course, this is all happening as israel and hamas at the tipping point of all-out war. the israelis carrying out 80 air strikes overnight with hamas fighters launching 95 rockets into israel. 38 more palestinians killed, bringing the death toll since last week to 111. cnn has confirmed secretary of state hillary clinton is heading to israel in the air at this very moment. tomorrow she will meet with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. she'll also visit egypt and the west bank city of ramallah. and while the two sides are trading cease-fire proposals, israel's ambassador tells erin burnett his country is ready to launch a full-scale ground invasion. we talk to our reporter in phnom penh. she's
-organized fringe of radical birthers, the election of a black president doesn't tell us much about the structural barriers that continue to face the vast majority of black citizens. it doesn't tell us much about the narrow arena of electoral arena for black candidates. maybe you've noticed there's not one african-american in the united states senate. we're called 2008 with an open seat race. unpopular wars, a crushing -- a nation that was crashing in terms of the economy and exhausted the with the incumbent george w. bush opened the door wide for a democrat to win. throughout american history, race has been a disqualifier even if favorable, political circumstances. not in 2008. overall, american voters did not -- this is meaningful if imperfect progress. in three days, we'll learn if america's first black president will be re-elected. the conditions are very different this time around. he is the incumbent, the economy is still limping and it may be harder generally to win reelection of our previous 42 presidents. only 16 were elected to two terms. if america doesn't choose president obama again,
could get rain and snow. storm-team 4 meteorologist veronica johnson will tell us how much and when. >>> but first, decision day after months and months of campaigning. billions of dollars spent. the election is finally here. the final push that could decide the course of the country for the next four years. this is it. good afternoon, everybody. i'm jim handly. >> i'm pat lawson muse. we are on the trail with president obama and mitt romney. and we're also watching the polls in your neighborhood. we begin with news4's adam tuss in battleground virginia. he joins us live. the lines have been long today. >> reporter: here at this polling place, the line has been about two and a half to three hours long all day. right now, it is moving. that's the good news. it still stretches down the hill and then has to go into the building. waiting to be a part of history. some in the cold shade dance a jig to stay warm keeping the feet moving. once inside the door, greeted by reality again. the line here snaking around corners. twisting and turning before the finish line finally in sight. >> it h
to the streets this weekend. >> now that we know who our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in n
, we thank you for that support. without which we couldn't do this program. it's a pleasure for us to have with us this morning, the chief of staff of the united states army, general ray odierno. general odierno is from new jersey. anybody who is from new jersey these days has been a little bit distracted. new jersey took the brunt of the storm. i grew up in louisiana. we are sort of used to this sort of thing, but we don't usually have hurricanes that have a wind chill and snowfall associated with them. which complicates matters. i hope everyone's all right up there this morning. we have been doing this series recently focusing on where are the military services going? it's a very important point of history. general odierno started in the army back during not the last draw down but the one before that. the one after vietnam. those of you who have been coming to our events know we have been talking about draw downs for some time now. eventually it had to get here and we are now at the cusp of one. we don't know how long, far, or deep. but there are a lot of lessons from the past th
. >> the president: you, the american people, reminded us that while our road has been hard. while our journey has been long. we have picked ourselves up. we have fought our way back. and we know in our hearts, that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> president obama will return to the white house this afternoon. he has no public events planned for today. before he declared victory mitt romney conceded gracefully. he told his supporters he called the president to congratulate him. he said it was time to put aside partisanship and work together for the good of the nation. >> i so wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation another leader. ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and this great nation. >> president obama says he looks forward to meeting with romney in the weeks ahead to discuss ways to move the country forward. >>> florida is still too close call even without it, president obama dominated the must-have swing states. he also took the popular vet by a narrow margin. katie marzullo joins a lo
. >> good morning, i'm pam cook. thank you for waking up with us this morning. let's check in with steve paulson. the weather is already changing i guess. but i did vote for warm weather, steve. >> then election came in for you on monday and tuesday. but for us rooking for colder weather the results will show up later today and more likely tomorrow. we have a very strong cold front coming in. today is that between day. 60s and 70s. a lot of the fog and low clouds are back. temperatures will begin their cool down. >>> traffic on 24 westbound between walnut creek and oakland looks good. the fog is not low here. steve has mentioned the fog. definitely foggier and chillier. the commute looks good on 80 now. but this last night there the freeway waclosed for more than five hours. this taxi cab happened in san francisco. it happened about two hours ago on 8th. the cab driver lost control and hit two parked cars and a parking meter before crashing into the side of the market there. firefighters had to use the jaws of life to get the driver out. the driver was injured. we don't know his conditio
to get this economy going. >> woodruff: we have two takes on the battle for the u.s. senate, beginning with the big money being spent in the most competitive races. we talk with npr's tamara keith. >> brown: and from arizona, we have the story of a former surgeon general challenging a six-term congressman for an open seat. >> woodruff: plus on the daily download, margaret warner looks at another way to reach out to voters with last minute messages on twitter. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the losses in life and property kept growing today, in the wake of "sandy". the death toll reached 92 and the focus on physical damage shifted to new jersey, where the monster storm blasted barrier islands and other
charges and aees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and b
let us wait. let big bill wait. see how this second obama term starts off. learn how the country is doing. watch, listen, enjoy life in this country. you have four years traveling the world. kick back and enjoy this country. i wish her well. that's "hardball" for now. the ed show starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. the president has told progressive leaders he's not budging on taxes. >> we're prepared to stand up for america. >> the campaign for the middle class begins at the white house, and the campaign pour millionaires has begun on the senate floor. >> half the congress opposes tax hikes. >> tonight, mary kay henry of the service employees international union and senator brown on the new campaign for the middle class. paul ryan is finally speaking, and he's still in the bubble. >> i think the surprise was some of the turnout. some of the turnout especially in urban areas. >> ohio state senator turner is here to respond. the petition to see seed is growing with speed. >> deep in the heart of texas! >> find out why i agree
bet you were close to saying i bet you $10,000. >> best in the u.s. or worldwide? >> the u.s. >> the readers' favorite city. >> we'll do a gentleman's bet. i'm going to go with san antonio, texas. >> respect your answer, but it's incorrect. >> san francisco. >> incorrect. >> one of the ones -- that's been like number one. >> that's moved on to number two so we'll get that to you. >> where was san antonio? >> it's a tease. >> come on, let's go. >> give me number three. let's get a check of the top stories this morning with natalie over at the news desk. >> good morning, matt, savannah and willie, good morning, everyone. an historic night as president obama wins a second term in the white house. the commander in chief addressed the cheering crowd in chicago after picking up more than 300 electoral votes. nbc's kristen welker hats very latest from chicago. good morning, kristen. >> natalie, good morning to you. after months of campaigning and spending record amounts of money, president obama declared victory. there is a lot riding on this second term, especially with the stagnan
us that none of the vote has been counted. how can you say that mitt romney has won west virginia? well, all of our cbs news projections tonight will be based on the vote that has been counted and also our exit polling. we have been talking to voters in all of these states all day long as they've left the polling places and based on that exit poll information, we will project winners in these states and we will do so only when we have complete confidence in that projection. now let's look at that battleground states that we keep referring to tonight. these are the states that could go either way. these are the states that are going to tip the balance tonight for one candidate or the other. the polls have closed in a few of them, but many are still voting. in the state of virginia, we do not have a projection, but this is the tabulated vote as we see it so far. just 2% of the vote has been counted. mitt romney out with a lead there. this is a state that president obama won by 6% in 2008, but again, the mitt romney lead may or may not last because only 2% of the vote has been counte
that tell us the most about politics. everyone thinks the popular vote is close to 50-50. >> that's right. we see in the states that have closed, there are a couple of calls. obama doing great in the northeast. mitt romney, doing well in the south. states projected for obama, vermont, maine. going out on a limb. and for romney, he has georgia, indiana, south carolina, west virginia. the ones we care about, virginia and ohio. they feel ok about florida and virginia. but a sign of trouble. jonathan martin is hearing the margins for him in chesterfield county just outside of richmond, where he is doing well, it is not good enough. if he's losing there, it's a sign of trouble in the state. in ohio, romney is worried about the midwest. wisconsin, and ohio, real nervousness. in the obama war room, confidence. exit polls looked good for john kerry. there are jokes about president kerry. but their models are coming in. the vote is coming in how they expected. >> one state declared is indiana, which obama won and it is called for romney. it shows the map is smaller this time, the map is smaller. s
. joins me now is u.s. senator sherrod brown. we have nina turner coming up later on. >> i love watching nina on your show. >> i get you passionate ohio folks mixed up. >> that's okay. >> sherrod brown with us and mary kay henry, president of the services employment international union who met with the president today. i would be remiss, mary kay, if i did not ask you right off the bat, did the president say he was not going to budge on taxes? he did it once in 2010, and he won't do it again? >> the president was incredibly serious and focused and really relieved to hear that we are going to keep our ground game going, that our working people and community members all across this country are ready to have this fight and want to have the middle class tax cuts permanently extended. that's the action that congress can take right now. and then work together to make sure that the wealthiest americans pay their fair share so we can get back to work. >> well, did he tell the group that he was not going to budge on taxes? >> he was crystal clear about that, yes. >> so you're confirming the huffi
correspondent for studio b and the report on fox newschannel. >> should we hone our use of drones? the new york times reports that prior to election day, the obama administration was developing a rule book for unmanned aircraft strikes on terrorists so that if romney won he would inherit clear guidelines. the issues are not as urgent now. obama won allegedly, but the administration is still pushing to formalize the rules and nail down exactly when deadly force is justified. they are debating whether drones should be a last resort against imminent threat to our country or something else like in pakistan where they are deployed against militants whose main grudge is with pakistani authoritiesment the president has miss givings telling one interviewer, quote, there is a remotist to it that helps us think somehow we can solve vexing security problems. for more, let's go live to qet red eye"'s correspondent chip herrington. >> i don't know how he got his security credentials. are we going too far with drones or not far enough? >> you are solving vexing security problems which is a nice why the stuff
-sex marriage. of >> when they see us on their front doorstep >> ifill: special correspondent john tulenko tells the story of teachers coming to the rescue of families in storm-ravaged new jersey. knocking and they realize it's us and we're here to see if they're okay, their faces lit up. >> brown: and we have three reports about veterans, beginning with a pro publica investigation into lost or destroyed combat records. >> ifill: then we talk with a veteran who has written about how we choose to remember those who serve. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with first-time author and iraq war veteran kevin powers about his novel, "the yellow birds." that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident, i was worried the healthcare system spoke on with all its own. with united healthcare, i got help that treat my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 p
started. this is live coverage running just a few minutes late. again, a reminder you can follow us on facebook and facebook.com/booktv and we have exclusive updates and author interviews, et cetera on her facebook page. just waiting for mr. patterson. this should be to shortly ensure that coverage of the miami book fair international 29th year. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon. please take your seats. we are about to begin the session. thank you so much. i am marilou harrison and many of you have heard from me because he been in this room yesterday and today. i served as a volunteer here, a very proud: tiered of miami book fair international candidate to recognize is that done before, all of the volunteers come to thousands of volunteers for miami dade college as well as the community who come together reach you to think this book fair take place. i'd also like to recognize those who are fri
as the president's people told us did end up being demographics and turnout. latinos continue their embrace of the democrats and the rejection of the republicans. the white share of the vote was 72% which was exactly what plouffe, axelrod and mecino told us it would be. we want to break news here. >> we have mugs. we are excited. i'm sure our viewers are excited. >> on a day of big news, this was breaking. >> this is what we care about. no. we get in to the politics of this, what happened, the demographic break down and quickly say what this means for the country. health care stays. it means paul ryan's budget is essentially irrelevant since they weren't able to get the majority in the senate and maybe more importantly i think latino voters made their voice heard loud and clear to both parties in this election and comprehensive immigration reform of some sort will have to be a priority in the next administration. >> you're absolutely right. the gop has to move to the left on the immigration. latino issues. black and brown voters emerged this year as power brokers saying white people cannot
also reporter ruth conniff with us tonight here on "the ed show" that is "the ed show" from new york city. "the ed schultz." "the daily rundown" starts now with chuck todd. have a great weekend. see you here tomorrow morning. >>> as we fall back from daylight savings, the candidates are using every minute of that extra hour. president obama bounces from one battleground state to another using ohio as his airline hub. he's using all the hot spots trying to rally his base and any undecided voters he thinks are left. governor romney is also racing against the clock, tweaking his closing argument just slightly to get into the end zone. and in case you forgot, we've got more than two guys running on tuesday, tonight we'll break down all of the battles, particularly for congress and who will decide control of it and what the next president can get done. good evening from democracy plaza. here in new york city, it is saturday, november 3, 2012. this is a prime time edition of "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. i call it my election preview special, so we'll get to my first reads with
to this special edition of the newshour. kwame holman starts us off tonight with an election day wrap-up. then, we take the temperature at the campaigns' headquarters, with ray suarez in chicago and margaret warner in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more tha
the director of national intelligence james clapper on election night, according to a senior u.s. intelligence official. the white house says it was notified the day after the election, and the president the following day. that doesn't make sense to house homeland security chairman peter king. >> this seems to have been going on for several months yet now it appears they're saying that the fbi didn't realize until election day that general petraeus was involved. it just doesn't add up. >> "the new york times" reports the fbi actually started its investigation late this summer. the house and senate intelligence committees were also caught by surprise. >> are you going to investigate why the fbi didn't notify you before? >> yes, absolutely. i mean, this is something that could have had an effect on national security. i think we should have been told. >> the fbi was investigating harassing e-mails from petraeus' biographer. the trail led to paula broadwell, who co-wrote "all in," a biography of petraeus. broadwell described her extraordinary access to the general earlier this year on cnn. >> at s
'm natalie morales. >> and i'm willie geist. thanks for sharing part of your day with us this morning. whether you're waking up to stuff the bird or maybe just bracing yourself for the arrival of some of those relatives. >> expanding waistlines. >> a lot of new balloons, a lot of fun this morning. >> great balloons, a lot of great characters, some of your favorites and new ones, as well. all those kids will be smiling across the country. also performing on national tv. pop stars on floats. you've got to love it. it is always my favorite kind of day. and matt, savannah, and al are hosting nbc's coverage of the parade. we're going to see what's in store in just a few minutes. >> and a beautiful day for it, as well. >>> then as we mentioned, black friday quickly becoming black thursday with the doors opening today. coming up, we'll tell you where to find the best deals if you're going right from the dinner table to the mall. >>> and basketball had the dream team, music had the rat pack. well, this morning, we had our own all-star lineup in the kitchen today. martha stewart and giada de l
at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters in washington shortly before noon. a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people to the hospital, one in serious condition. construction workers were among the few people in that building because it is a holiday weekend. >>> investigators are still trying to figure out the source of a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings in springfield, massachusetts, last night. a wwlp camera captured the moment of the blast. 18 people were injured, mostly emergency workers. they had been called to the scene because of reports of a gas smell. they had evacuated some of the area about an hour before that explosion. >>> superstorm sandy has now cost new jersey -- the tab is at $29 billion and the number is expected to rise. governor chris christie's office says the final total will only be known after taking into account things like next summer's tourist season. new york governor andrew cuomo says he will ask the federal government for $30 billion to help with h
gives us an update first. >> reporter: hi, dana. this is the first bit of broadcast history for "the five." rolling live from richmond to virginia beach with the romney campaign. in the back of the bus with the rust of the reporters trailing around the republican nominee as we close in on the election day. mr. romney has been spending a tremendous amount of time in the last couple of days talking about his desire to be a bipartisan president, reach across the aisle and deal with democrats to meet the challenge that nation faces, challenges he argues that mr. obama has not been able to meet and been too partisan and unwilling to meet with republicans on it. in the event in richmond, he singled out the house leader eric cantor and asked when is the last time you met with the president? cantor said it was a year ago. romney said i will not do that. i will meet often with the democrats and create the type of bipartisan agreements that move the country forward. he is making the argument that it's time for big change. borrowed rhetoric from the 2008 obama campaign that he says the presiden
will still be in charge of the senate. >> it's now whether president obama decides to come into office, use this victory as an opportunity to make compromises with the republicans. >> apparently, all he those do is show up in a nice suit, give them free health care, save the auto industry and kill bin laden, and that old girl will put out. >> the senate battle in massachusetts, elizabeth warren beat incumbent republican scott brown. >> tammy baldwin has become the first openly gay candidate to win a u.s. senate seat. >> all that -- >> ohio will go for obama. >> percent certainty? >> 99.95%. >> we've got to be careful about calling things. we've got to be very cautious about intruding on this process. >> well, folks -- >> hold on, hold on -- >> i worked for the guy who balanced the budget. you came in and exploded it and now you're complaining to me? >> and all that matters. >> it's never too early to start talking about the next election. [ laughter ] right? >> and you know that somebody's planning it. >> on "cbs this morning." >> two years, $3 billion, and we are clearly in the same [ blee
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 213 (some duplicates have been removed)